MAT just trades one addiction for another.
True
False

MAT bridges the biological and behavioral components of addiction. Research indicates that a combination of medication and behavioral therapies can successfully treat SUDs and help sustain recovery.

MAT can be a significant component of long term recovery.
True
False

MAT bridges the biological and behavioral components of addiction. Research indicates that a combination of medication and behavioral therapies can successfully treat SUDs and help sustain recovery.

MAT should only be used in severe cases.
True
False

MAT utilizes a multitude of different medication options (agonists, partial agonists and antagonists) that can be tailored to fit the unique needs of the patient.

MAT increases the risk for overdose in patients.
True
False
MAT does not affect risk for overdose in patients

MAT helps to prevent overdoses from occurring. Even a single use of opioids after detoxification can result in a life-threatening or fatal overdose. Following detoxification, tolerance to the euphoria brought on by opioid use remains higher than tolerance to respiratory depression.

Providing MAT will only disrupt and hinder a patient's recovery process.
True
False

MAT has been shown to assist patients in recovery by improving quality of life, level of functioning and the ability to handle stress. Above all, MAT helps reduce mortality while patients begin recovery.

While MAT can be affective, abstinence is better.
True
False

MAT is evidence-based and is the recommended course of treatment for opioid addiction. American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry, American Medical Association, The National Institute on Drug Abuse, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other agencies emphasize MAT as first line treatment.

Most insurance plans cover MAT.
True
False

As of May 2013, 31 state Medicaid FFS programs covered methadone maintenance treatment provided in outpatient programs. State Medicaid agencies vary as to whether buprenorphine is listed on the Preferred Drug List (PDL), and whether prior authorization is required (a distinction often made based on the specific buprenorphine medication type). Extended-release naltrexone is listed on the Medicaid PDL in over 60% of states.